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Early Retirement Isn't About How Wealthy You Are

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Source: Business Insider

When it comes to early retirement, there's no discounting the importance of having enough money saved to retire early, but many early retirees will tell you the truth: money doesn't really matter once you get there.

Brandon of the blog Mad Fientist, who retired at age 34, previously told Business Insider he wishes he knew how "unimportant and insignificant" money would be after retiring early.

CBU Advisor Lance Gilman's Daughters, Josette and Lydia, Receive Talent Scholarship

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From TheTownLine.org:

Sisters Josette and Lydia Gilman were each recipients of $250 in talent scholarship money from the Alfond Youth Center (AYC). For the past three years, the AYC in Waterville has been hosting its talent show at the Page Com­mons on the Colby College campus. Each year, the AYC solicits talented youth from the Kennebec County/ greater Waterville area to compete for 10 slots available as part of its ‘Annual Appeal’ (Dinner and Talent Show). Scholarship money can be used by the awardees to further their performing talents.

CBU Benefits Sponsors the 2018 Maine HR Convention

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Last week, Combined Benefits United's sister company, CBU Benefits, hosted the Schooner Room Workshops at the 2018 Maine HR Convention in Rockport, ME for the 7th year in a row. The convention received record attendance levels this year, and it was great to meet so many HR professionals from across the state and discuss offering supplemental benefits to their employees.

How Living Longer is Changing Financial Advice

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By Joseph Coughlin, MIT AgeLab

In the last century, the American lifespan has increased beyond any historical precedent. In 1900, the average life expectancy was 47 years old. Today it is around 78, and for certain demographics — such as women with a college degree — it is closer to 85. Younger generations may be in line for even bigger longevity dividends. It’s possible that an American born in 2007 can expect to live past 100.

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